Category: Dataviz

Assignment 6 : Mahima Singh

With Rupert SandersGhost in the shell getting mixed reviews because fans kept comparing it to the original anime, I decided to do a comparison of anime with their live action counterparts.

I took the ratings from IMDB  and plotted it in this mixed bar chart.

The data entry into the JS code was easy enough, but formatting the original chart after that was a nice challenge.

I experimented with D3’s categorical colors and the charts’ axis formatting by writing a function of my own to make sure the ‘Rating” axis didn’t read negative values.

 

If you are familiar with pop culture and know a little bit about good cinema then you will know that James Wong’s white-washed adaptation of Dragon ball Z, Dragon ball Evolution was one of the worst live action remakes of any anime ever. So it is no surprise that Dragon Ball Evolution has the worst rating.

What is surprising to me is that Sailor Moon’s live adaptation (tv series) got the closest rating to its anime version. The Sailor Moon anime is a tough act to follow. But according to IMDB ratings, it looks like ‘Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon’ comes close enough.

Another obvious trend is the high ratings of the phenomenally successful anime, Death Note. While the anime did a little better, the film came pretty close and I say this from experience. Shûsuke Kaneko’s 2006 Death Note, had its pitfalls but it was a good movie. I doubt Netflix’s adaptation, set to release in August this year, will be able to live up to the hype. But we can only wait.

Here is a list of live action films (based on popular anime) in the making. Some names like Naruto, Bleach, Fullmetal Alchemist, Tokyo Ghoul and Attack on Titan have a lot riding on them because of their incredible fan base.

 

Assignment 6: GROH

I examined the relationship between overall crime in New York versus the amount of sentences for those crimes. The data reveals a slight decrease in overall crime and a sharp decrease in the amount of criminals sentenced. There could be a multitude of reasons for this, however; I expect the cause to be an already over populated jail system and the sentiment that “lesser” crimes shouldn’t be punishable by prison sentences.

Assignment 6: Carla Caban

For this assignment, I decided to look into unemployment rates from the past 10 years and compare them with the number of new jobs created. The dates are kind of off. I used the excel sheet but for some reason the dates are not exact. I got my unemployment data here and the numbers of new jobs created over the past 10 years here. I couldn’t figure out how to put the percentage sign after the number and not before so if someone knows how to please let me know.

Assignment 5 : Mahima Singh

Morbid warning.

After doing research for a project for my Natural Language Processing class, I came across this database of the Last Statement of inmates on death row in Texas.

I decided to scrape the website, pull out the last statements and figure out what the most used words were. You can find the code on my GitHub here.

As we can guess, by the end of their time, an inmate does think of their family.
The word ‘Love’ is used the most, followed by ‘Family’. Other words relating to retribution such as ‘God’ and ‘Sorry’ also make the top-15 list.

Here is the full data that is available on the site.  The “Info” column will give you information on the inmate and the crimes the committed and the “Link” column will take you to the text of their last statement.

 

FactTexas was the first state in the world to carry out an execution by lethal injection in 1982 

Assignment 4 : Mahima Singh

Disney just announced that they plan to continue telling Star Wars stories for the next 15 years. As an ‘EU’ (extended universe) fan of the franchise, I am excited that the Star Wars cannon will continue to grow in my lifetime. In my nostalgic look back at episode I-VII, I realized that characters hardly ever say the word ‘lightsaber’ in the films.  After a quick fan-forum search I learned that the word Lightsaber is used only eight times in all the films till episode VII.   I decided to do a histogram of some of the more popular Star Wars phrases.

May the Force be with you

I have a bad feeling about this

The Force

The Dark Side

I scraped through the scripts of episodes I-VII ( The official script of Rogue one hasn’t been released yet) and counted the number of times each phrase was said and by whom.

This two-level drill down of a treemap represents that dataset.

Design wise I wanted to do a lot more. But as we studied in class, High charts, like any other third-party application, has its drawbacks when it comes to customization.

Assignment 4 – Elena DeLuccia

I decided to take a look at Donald Trump’s tweeting activity in the days following inauguration (January 20th). There is a clear distinction between which tweets he authored and those he decided to retweet.

Assignment 3 – Elena DeLuccia

I thought it would be a good idea to do a timeline on something really relevant to news right now. So I decided to do mine on how Jeff Sessions got to the Attorney General position. I updated it to include the most recent controversies with his contact with Russia, and will continue to update if there are any other developments throughout the weekend!

 

2/28 Lecture Notes: No-Code Dataviz tools, CartoDB

12:30: Housekeeping

12:31-12:50: Guest: Jodi Upton, Knight Chair in Data and Explanatory Journalism.

12:50-1: Your Infogr.ams (assignment 2).

1-1:40: Other no-code dataviz tools

But first, HTML! You can go through these three self-guided HTML teaching tools on your own.

Simple No-Code Dataviz Tools

Here are the ones we will go over today:

1) Infogr.am (http://infogr.am)

Infogr.am is an easy way to create simple charts and graphs, as well as scrolling infographics that you may notice people posting in places like Facebook and Tumblr. For journalism I think the graphs and charts work best, because you can embed them directly into stories to visually explain something you are reporting in text.

Take note of the Graphs and Charts tab at the top. Click the Charts tab to see all the different types of charts you can use.  Choose your visualization type, double click diferent parts of the interface to edit them, and copy and paste your data in. If you have trouble copying data from a web site, try starting from a summary sheet you make in Excel.

Click “Share” and copy the iFrame code at the bottom to embed into the blog. If you find that your chart is too wide for the blog post, you have two choices.  You can manually change the width and height variables in the HTML code you copied, being very careful not to change anything other than those numbers, or you can try the “responsive” code which will make your chart shrink or stretch based on the width of the page where it’s embedded. The second option is good if you think your chart will be viewed by people on mobile devices, but be sure to test it out from a mobile device to be sure.

Here’s an example of a chart I made in Infogr.am using data from a previous exercise.

Cardiac Deaths in Central New York Hospitals in 2010 | Create infographics

 

 

 

2) Easel.ly (http://easel.ly)

Think of Easel.ly as a quick infographic creator. You find a template you like, then start to manually edit it and add graphics from a built-in library. Charts can also be added and edited as spreadsheets, similar to Infogr.am.

 

3) Google Fusion Tables (http://fusiontables.google.com)

Google Fusion Tables  turns columns and rows of numbers in spreadsheets into visualizations. Once signed in, import a spreadsheet in .xls or .csv formats (not not .xlsx, which is Microsoft’s proprietary format). Make sure your spreadsheet has column headers, or it won’t work.

Sometimes Google will add a tab that it calls a “card” that is the best choice for your data — for example, a “Map of latitude” will appear if your data includes geocoordinates. If you see a card that works for you click it and see how it appears. If not, click the + sign to the right of that tab and choose Add a Chart. Click Done when your chart is set up the way you want it.

To publish your chart, you have to do two things:

1. Click the Share button at the very upper right of the browser, then “Change” next to Private under “Who can Access.” Select “Public on the Web” and then Save and Done.

2. Go to the Tools menu and choose Publish. You will see iframe tags here that you can embed in your blog post.

Here’s an example of a chart from Google Fusion Tables:

 

4) StoryMap (https://storymap.knightlab.com/)

From the Knight Lab at Medill, StoryMap lets you tell a story that’s broken up by points on a map. You can also use it to tell a story that moves across something that isn’t a map at all, such as a very detailed painting. Think of it like a timeline that takes place on a gigantic picture.

 

5) Google Maps (http://maps.google.com)

Quick overview of how Google Maps work if you don’t know already. Sign into Google, then choose the three lines at upper left and choose Your Places. Click Maps, then Create a Map. To embed it, you must first click the Share button in edit mode and change the access to “Public on the Web.” Then you can choose Embed.

 

6) CartoDB – Prepare for Thursday (http://cartodb.com)

On Thursday we will crack open CartoDB, which is a powerful mapping service that lets you tweak some of the interface and mess with a code a little. You can think of it as the gateway drug to other dataviz tools we will use that do require you to mess around with code. You can get a head start on how to use CartoDB through these free video tutorials on their web site.

Today I will show how we can create a map of the bridges in New York State that are in need of repair.

 

Assignment 2 – Elena

2016-2017 NYS School Budgets by County
Create line charts

I took data from https://openbudget.ny.gov/schoolAidForm.html in order to develop an infographic that would show how much each county gets for its school budget for this year.

I filtered the information to only include the sum of the total budgets for each city in each county, then inputted each of these sums into the infographic to create a graphic representation of each county.

Dataviz, Week 1, Class 1

NEW 300 / 600 – Professor Dan Pacheco
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

I. Welcome! An Introduction to using data visualization to tell stories.
– Let’s look at a few examples.

 

II. Class syllabus and expectations.
– Tuesday: instruction
– Thursday: lab
– Assignments due every Monday morning.

 

III. Class Blog, Spundge, Rebelmouse
Most of the assignments will be filed by embedding widget code into the class blog at http://journovationsu.org.

 

IV. Exercise: Introduce yourself through data!

1. Open this class roster in a web browser, or from your smartphone: http://jsfiddle.net/pachecod/HxpFX/embedded/result/.

2. Pull out your cell phone and take a “selfie,” or have your neighbor do it for you.

3. Email the file to yourself and download the image to your desktop.

4. Go to http://journovationsu.org/wp-login.php?action=register and register for an account (note: account registration is frozen now that the class has started). Check your email to get your temporary password, then click the link in the email to log in with that password.

5. After logging in for the first time, click the link at the very top of the screen inviting you to edit your profile and assign a permanent password. Click the Update button to save your new password.

6. Upload the selfie you took to your profile by clicking the Choose File button at the bottom of the page, then Update Profile.

7. Return to your profile by going to http://journovationsu.org/wp-admin/profile.php. Scroll down and right-click your photo. Choose View Image. Copy the URL for the image.

8. Finally, go this Google spreadsheet and paste your image URL into the image field. Fill out the rest of your information. (Note: the Google spreadsheet for this excercise is now frozen.)

9. Return to the  Class Roster page in step 1 (http://jsfiddle.net/pachecod/HxpFX/embedded/result/). You will also see information from others in the class as they add theirs. Look at the home page of http://journovationsu.org and you should also see your info there. This is because the output of the link above is embedded into the page.

 

Congrats! You Participated in a Data Visualization
You not only introduced yourself to the class, but you participated in your very first interactive data-driven visualization. The data is all in a Google spreadsheet, and some free Javascript and JQuery code called Tabletop.js that we will use in a future class pulls all of that data into a web page. Try changing any of your information and you will see that the public web roster updates in real time.

 

V. Assignments, due before next class:

1. Fill out class survey here (also linked into the class blog): http://journovationsu.org/2014/01/13/data-visualization-class-survey/

2. Read this summary from Jaimi Dowdell of IRE on on Excel functions for journalists: http://bit.ly/19aKVUa. We will go over some very basic Excel functions in class, but you are expected to learn more advanced functions needed for your projects on your own.